Rabbi Lawrence Hoffman presents, “An Hour of Wine and Moses: How the Seder Began, What It Was Supposed to Be, and How to Make it That Way Again.” for a special Tales from the Talmud class.

Rabbi Lawrence Hoffman presents, “An Hour of Wine and Moses: How the Seder Began, What It Was Supposed to Be, and How to Make it That Way Again.” for a special Tales from the Talmud class.

Date: Wednesday, March 24th, from noon to 1:00 PM.

Dr. Lawrence A. Hoffman was ordained as a rabbi in 1969, received his Ph.D. in 1973, and is now Professor Emeritus at the New York campus of the Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion, where he served for almost half a century. His teaching and research interests include liturgy, ritual, and worship; spirituality and theology; evolving American religion; and synagogue transformation and leadership.

For over half a century, he has combined research, classroom teaching, and a passion for the spiritual renewal of North American Judaism. He is known internationally for his lectures to popular audiences and his spiritual approach to synagogue consultation.

Rabbi Hoffman has written or edited forty-five books to date, including My People’s Prayer Book, a ten-volume edition of the Siddur with modern commentaries (and winner of a 2007 National Jewish Book Award). The follow-up My People’s Passover Haggadah appeared in February, 2008. In 2018, he completed Prayers of Awe, an eight-volume commentary on the prayers of the High Holy Days. His Rethinking Synagogues (2007) is widely used by congregations engaged in transformational change. His 100 Great Jewish Books is a popular guide to Judaism that introduces adults to the Jewish library of the centuries — from the Bible to today. For the Wexner Foundation, where he has taught for almost thirty years, he edited More than Managing, a collection of essays on leadership, to honor Les Wexner and the 30th anniversary of the foundation. His articles, both popular and scholarly, have appeared in eight languages and four continents.


The Talmud is a central Jewish text, famously full of legal debates, but also full of stories. These weekly classes will explore different tales from the Talmud, and what they reveal about human nature, relationships, ethics, and God. Beginning with a brief orientation to the Talmud and its place in Jewish tradition, we will study stories compiled in two books: The Land of Truth by Jeffrey Rubenstein, and A Bride for One Night by Ruth Calderon. Each session will stand on its own, so come every week or just drop in.

 This initiative is part of The Open Doors Institute and made possible by funds raised at the recent gala honouring Marc Gold.